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20100401
20100430
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
and deadly explosion in west virginia now has many people calling for stricter regulations. >> susie: tom, massey energy, the owner of that mine, is the sixth largest mining company in the country and one of the most profitable. but over the years it's been cited for hundreds of violations on safety issues. >> tom: it has, and massey's been fined nearly $400,000 in the past year. but as stephanie dhue reports, large fines may not be making the industry any safer. >> reporter: something clearly went very wrong at massey energy's upper big branch mine. west virginia governor joe manchin described what the rescuers witnessed. >> i can only say that when the rescuers that were in the mine and saw what they were able to see until they had to come out, and the type of damage that was done, that it had to be a horrific explosion to cause that kind of damage. >> reporter: the tragedy is sure to increase scrutiny of massey energy and the coal mining industry. a similar disaster at the sago mine four years ago that killed 12 people led congress to pass the miner act of 2006. the sweeping law requir
, virginia neighborhood once sold for close to $400,000. prices now are half as much. that makes owning an affordable option for first time home buyer issa viayrada. a high school spanish teacher, she's ready to settle down and has been shopping for a home. while she's made several offers, she hasn't had much luck. >> in this area, it's not so much about finding a house, it's about losing it to the highest bidder. >> reporter: the higher bidding is coming from investors, some who want to buy and rent the home, and others who want to flip it. one thing they have in common, says realtor mario rubio, is cash. >> the sellers or banks own, they would prefer to make a deal with a cash offer, which makes sense at this time, because the banks have been waiting, trying to sell these properties for so long. >> reporter: cash buyers now make up a quarter of the market, 10% is considered a normal level. in markets like d.c., southern california, and florida, those investors are pushing out first time buyers. some homes, like this one viayrada is looking at, were sold only a few months ago and now a
of the edgar lomax company, an investment advisory firm based in springfield, virginia. and welcome back to nightly business report. >> good to see you, tom. >> so before we talk about expectations from stock market returns what kind of shape do you think the balance sheet is in for the government and for households? >> it's getting worse. but starting from a strong point, so we're still the richest country in the world. and that gives us a lot to work with. at least though we do see some light at the end of the tunnel. household debt has been declining over the last year and a half. and that's new in the last, for some number of years. over the last year, for example this is 2009, we've actually seen household debt fall about 237 billion which is just under 2%. >> how do you think the u.s. consumer is doing as we enter the second quarter of 2010 though? >> i think individually they are getting stronger by having-- by borrowing less and therefore saving a bit more. however, though, we're doing it by shifting much of what would be individual accumulation of debt on to the government's bal
high school in alexandria, virginia, the students come here-- to the college and career center-- to talk strategy. >> did you hear back from any of the colleges other than mary washington? >> reporter: choosing a college is their first challenge. paying the bill is another problem altogether. >> i'm ready for it. if i have to, then sure, why not. >> reporter: senior farishta boura says she's willing to take out loans to pay for pricey george washington university. >> knowledge is something that i can invest in, and never lose money on. >> reporter: her classmate haset solomon feels the same way. >> i have to finance my education somehow. my parents won't be able to pay for it. so it's my education, my responsibility. >> reporter: two-thirds of undergraduates borrow money for college, and paying tuition this year may be especially tough. a record number of students in the u.s. are already taking out government loans, and in the 2008-2009 school year, they borrowed 25% more than the year before. sarah bauder is the financial aid director at the university of maryland, where the n
suit filed by the widow of one of the 29 miners killed in a west virginia coal mine explosion last week. the woman says massey's long list of safety problems amounts to negligence. and it that list is growing. federal investigators have found more than 60 new safety violations at massey mines since the blast. those violations include problems on a conveyer belt in a mine where a belt fire killed 2 people in 2006. caption test caption test caption test caption test euu caption test caption test caption test >> susie: japanese automaker toyota said today it tested a luxury s.u.v. deemed a safety risk, and got the same results. that test came this week, after "consumer reports" magazine said the lexus g.x. 460 can roll over. toyota is looking at potential fixes for the problem. meanwhile, the automaker could be heading back to capitol hill for another round of hearings. the house energy and commerce committee has set may 6 to review the automaker's electric throttles. those throttles are at the heart of questions about sudden acceleration in toyota and lexis vehicles. >> the civil fraud ch
. he singled out massey energy for "a failure of management" that led to the west virginia mine tragedy that killed 29 workers. massey called the president's remarks "regrettable." >> so tom, it looks like this winning streak continues on wall street with all of the major indexes continuing to post new highs. >> best winning streak for the dow, in fact, in the past month, as a matter of fact. so let's take a look at what is fueling it in tonight's market focus. a bit of a choppy day, but the markets had an upward bias, helped by earnings in technology and transportation. you heard about google's better- than-expected earnings earlier in the program. going into the results, google was up 1%, but after the close, it dropped more than 4%. over the past 12 months, the stock is up 57%. more than 95% of its first quarter revenues came from ads it put on its web sites and the sites of others. while its youtube, online documents, and android smartphone business get lots of attention, those remain a small piece of the revenue picture. also in technology, advanced micro devices turned in a record
that stretches from west virginia to new york saw buying. rex energy, exco resources and range resources, each up 4% or more on heavy volume. as jeff reported earlier, hopes are high merger activity is beginning to pick up. certainly merger rumors are picking up. not a week goes by recently without some kind of merger rumor fueling big volume in shares of palm. the latest speculation came today from a chinese language version of a technology news website, reporting smart phone maker h.t.c. is talking to palm. the stock was among the most active. jacobs engineering group also is in the rumor mill as a possible private equity buyout target. and casey's general store stock shot up after it rejected a hostile buyout from a canadian convenience store operator. insurance giant aetna will have to stop enrolling new customers in its medicare advantage or medicare prescription drug plans beginning april 21. the federal government ordered the halt because aetna has not followed certain requirements for the drug prescription plans for seniors. shares of aetna dropped below $33 a share at mid day when the ne
agreement here in the senate, develop by senator warner from virginia, which ac published what we needed to accomplish. it had a prefunded event, and i have reservations about that. not because i'm against a prefunded event, but knowing the congress i do, they'll spend it on something else, instead of protecting the taxpayer. but there are ways to address that, too. i don't see that as an issue that is a high hurdle to get around. >> susie: let me bring up another point that congressman barney frank said on our programme. he said if this proposed financial reform were already law, it would have prevented the alleged fraud of goldman sachs. is that how you see it? >> i don't know the answer to that question because i haven't really read the case and the issue. but i would pointer out that the fraud action was brought, so there were obviously laws on the books to address the issue. i don't think -- my concern here is people are making this event in a way that is causing us to legislate on one event. the issues involved here are much, much broader and more complicated and much more sophisti
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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